REYKJAVIK – THE HOSTING CITY

THE CITY OF REYKJAVIK

Reykjavík is so much more than just a destination; it’s a place of exciting possibilities surrounded by incredible landscapes, where countless adventures beckon and a host of natural wonders await.

 

REYKJAVÍK CAPITAL AREA

The Reykjavík Capital Area is the country’s largest and most populated city and currently home to 203.594 people, that’s two-thirds of the entire Icelandic population!

Although it’s one of the smallest capital cities in the world, it’s still big enough to fit in six super-sized districts, with Reykjavík as the largest having a population of 118.814. Each district has its own elected council that governs the community and is responsible for the execution of legally determined projects.

 

BEAUTIFUL REYKJAVIK

Reykjavík manages to combine a terrific blend of hip and wholesome, but without the stressthat usually follows a cosmopolitan metropolis.

 

 

 

WINTER IN REYKJAVIK

There’s never a dull day in Reykjavík during the wintertime, even if the days are dark!

Apart from the occasional fall of luminous snow and regular displays of Northern Lights, there’s also a full calendar of cultural events with festivities galore, concerts, plays and many seasonal exhibitions.

 

 

NORTHERN LIGHTS IN REYKJAVIK

Iceland is renowned for its otherworldly illuminations, the Northern Lights being one remarkable example. This particular phenomenon, also known as the Aurora Borealis, can be experienced in Iceland during the winter time, especially on those clear, crisp nights, where they appear in a variety of colours and intensity, either twirling gently in shades of milky green, or occasionally blazing in a wild and multi-coloured dance across the

night sky.

The Northern Lights are generated in the upper atmosphere as it gets bombarded by electronically charged particles from the sun. They form what is known as ‘auroral belts’ around the geomagnetic poles and occur high above the Earth’s surface, at altitudes between 100-250km, where the atmosphere is extremely thin.

 

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